Two years ago, I worked for the largest evangelical university in the world. I was a rising star in my office. I had been promoted multiple times into leadership positions they created specifically for me. I had a team I supervised, and I was the go-to person if someone needed a question answered. I successfully made myself indispensable, and I felt important.

 

Life was good.

 

Then I received a seemingly random phone call from Pastor Jon. He asked if I would consider joining the staff at Brentwood Church as his executive assistant. My initial thought was “uh… what?” but he asked me to prayerfully consider it. Truth be told, I initially wanted to say “no”. I had been an administrative assistant before and hated it with (what I like to describe as) a burning passion. Let’s just say it wasn’t a good experience; one I did not want to repeat.

 

But God started me on a journey that day that would change the trajectory of my life. After a month of discussions with Pastor Jon filled with wisdom and patience, God asked me to leave my job at the university to work for His Church. More than that, he called me to exchange the comfort, security, and sense of identity I felt at this job for the unknown.

 

I am not going to lie. I cried. I bargained. I wrestled. But after it all, one question remained: What am I unwilling to sacrifice to follow Jesus?

 

This question struck me hard then, and it still does now. You see, it has a way of revealing the idols in my life—the things that have more value to me than God Himself—and the depth of my faith.

 

I am reminded of the Israelites and their journey out of slavery in Egypt into the land God had promised them. There were countless times that the Israelites had the opportunity to respond to their circumstances in faith. Instead, they chose to respond in faithlessness and disobedience. They often lament, “It would have been better for us to serve the Egyptians than to die in the desert!” (Exodus 14:12b). They wanted to return to slavery. They had made it into an idol. Their focus wasn’t on the miraculous rescue and provision God showed them daily. It was on their momentary circumstances and the comfort they could derive from it.

Their focus wasn’t on the miraculous rescue and provision God showed them daily. It was on their momentary circumstances and the comfort they could derive from it.

God gives us the same opportunity in our circumstances. Will we respond in faith and place our hope in the living God or act like the Israelites seeking momentary comfort and security?

 

I chose to be obedient, step out in faith, and trust God.

 

Two years later, I find myself writing this blog post, incredibly grateful that God has given me the opportunity to work at Brentwood Church. By the grace of God, my life has been radically transformed. My comfort, security, and identity are not found in the things of this world but in God who gives me a living hope.

 

God had me exchange what was seemingly good for that which is far better—a more intimate knowledge of His character and a deeper relationship with Him.

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